Association for Community Organization & Social Administration

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SSWR 21st Annual Conference

Community & Neighborhood Research Cluster: Society for Social Work Research (SSWR) Conference


January 11-15, 2017, New Orleans

We wanted to let you know that the newly formed Community & Neighborhood Research Cluster in the Society for Social Work Research (SSWR) is off to a terrific start. At the upcoming SSWR Annual Meeting (Jan. 11-15th in New Orleans), there will be a wide range of workshops, roundtables, symposia, poster sessions and panels on such topics as neighborhood indicators, community engagement, participatory research, community health and wellbeing, violence reduction, activism, youth participation and more. In addition, there are two special interest groups that will meet: one on Community Level Intervention Research and the other on Community Based Practice & Research. Conference information, including the schedule of events and presentations, can be found at http://secure.sswr.org/2017-conference-home/. The Community & Neighborhood Cluster compliments the existing Organization & Management Cluster so a full array of macro related research will be available.

 

Three Newly Added Special Sessions at SSWR 2017-Exciting!

The SSWR Board has provided space for members to reflect, discuss, and plan for the changing political landscape in our country. SSWR as an organization is very concern how the changing political environment will impact social work research and social policy. The 2017 program schedule will include the following three (3) new special sessions:

 

Friday, January 13, 2017, 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm, La Galeries 3, Session # 90A

Social Work's Role in Shaping the Narrative: Action Steps for Effective Post-Election Participation

Lenna Nepomnyaschy, PhD (Rutgers University), Darcey Merritt, PhD (New York University), Former Rep. Edolphus Towns (NY), Congresswoman Karen Bass (CA), Charles Lewis, PhD (Congressional Research Institute for Social Work and Policy). (Additional panelists TBD)

As social work scholars, we have a responsibility to use our knowledge and skill set to advance a democratic and inclusive society. We recognize that our academic training may not sufficiently prepare us to effectively participate in the political process, especially in these times. This panel focuses on concrete action steps that social work researchers and scholars can take to push back against the racist, xenophobic, and anti-democratic rhetoric that dominated the election and that we fear has become normalized in this post-election period. The panel also focuses on strategic approaches to countering policy alternatives that lack legitimacy on moral and evidentiary grounds while encouraging healthy debate of diverse policy options, including shaping a bold narrative in a manner that aligns with our social work values and ethics. (This panel is one of three made possible with financial support from the schools of social work at Rutgers University, New York University, and University of Chicago.)

 

Saturday, January 14, 2017, 7:00 am - 8:00 am, La Galeries 3, Session # 169A

ADVOCACY in Schools of Social Work in Response to the 2016 Presidential Election

Darcey Merritt, PhD (New York University), Jennifer I. Manuel, PhD (New York University), Lenna Nepomnyaschy, PhD (Rutgers University), Julia R. Henly, PhD (University of Chicago), Amy Thompson, MPA (University of Texas at Austin)

As social workers, we have an ethical responsibility to the broader society to create equitable access to resources and opportunities for all, especially for vulnerable and oppressed groups. The racism, xenophobia, misogyny, anti-Semitism and heterosexism stemming from this election reinforce and exacerbate long-standing injustices and structural oppression, which threaten everything that social work champions. This session is designed to bring together social work colleagues to share existing advocacy efforts at schools of social work and to discuss opportunities to build a national social work strategy for dismantling structural oppression. The session organizers will facilitate the discussion, but the session is designed to be participatory in nature and involve all attendees. (This panel is one of three made possible with financial support from the schools of social work at Rutgers University, New York University, and University of Chicago.)

 

Saturday, January 14, 2017, 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm, La Galeries 3, Session # 222A

Strategizing Social Work Practice with Immigrant Populations in the Current Political Climate

Amy Thompson, MPA (University of Texas at Austin), Monica Faulkner, PhD, LMSW (University of Texas at Austin), Hannah Szlyk, LCSW (University of Texas at Austin), Ken Borelli, MSW, ACSW (former deputy director of the Santa Clara County Department of Family and Children's Services, Ann E. Webb, J.D., LMSW (Moderator) (University of Houston). (Additional panelists TBD)

The incoming administration has promised aggressive changes to US immigration policy within its first 100 days, including: the deportation of millions and the elimination of pathways to legal immigration for millions more. Whether and how these promises will be implemented is uncertain. Social work research identifies the negative impacts of uncertain legal status on immigrant youth and families. The literature demonstrates that immigration-related stressors can adversely impact the mental and emotional health of immigrant and first-generation children, including the presence of depression, anxiety, and suicidality. A panel of researchers, clinicians, and students will consider the material and psychological implications of a Trump presidency on immigrants, especially undocumented and mixed-status families and youth, and identify strategies for social workers to pursue their professional duty to empower and advocate on behalf of affected populations through research, practice, and policy work. (This panel is one of three made possible with financial support from the schools of social work at Rutgers University, New York University, and University of Chicago.)

 

For additional information, please contact the session facilitators directly (see below).

  • Dr. Julia R. Henly, University of Chicago ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )
  • Dr. Jennifer I. Manuel, New York University ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )
  • Dr. Darcey Merritt, New York University ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )
  • Dr. Lenna Nepomnyaschy, Rutgers University ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )
  • Amy Thompson, University of Texas, Austin ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )